Fruit Bowl

written and illustrated by Mark Hoffman

 

Fruit Bowl is informative and does a good job at explaining what makes a fruit and fruit. At one point in the book I was surprised at one of the fruits that I always thought was a veggie. This book really shows the reader and listener just how many “veggies” are not really veggies but as the book says: Fruits in disguise. Fruit Bowl  is a great book to read during the summer before heading out to the farmers market or before planting your own fruit and vegetable plants. I could see teachers using this in a seasonal unit – healthy eating unit – or fruits and vegetable unit. The dialogue is fast and witty many of the puns will go over a younger reader/listener but will not take away from the book. They will think they are funny while the reader (parent or teacher) will really think they are funny. I thought the fruit and vegetable heated debate between all of the fruit bowl being done in bubble text form was a great idea. Not only does it make the dialogue seem more like a conversation among the fruits and veggies but also introduces the reader/listener to graphic novel text and other ways to present a story line and dialogue. The colorful simple illustrations are spot on and make your eyes really take it all in. Grab a copy of Fruit Bowl this summer and have some fun reading and maybe even trying a new fruit to add to your fruit bowl at home.

About the book: Who belongs in the fruit bowl? Apples, check. Blueberries, check. Tomato, che— Wait, what?! Tomato wants to join the other fruits, but does he belong? The perfect mix of botany and a bunch of bananas!   

All the fruit are in the bowl. There’s Apple and Orange. Strawberry and Peach. Plum and Pear. And, of course, Tomato.
Now wait just a minute! Tomatoes aren’t fruit! Or are they?  Using sly science (and some wisdom from a wise old raisin), Tomato proves all the fruit wrong and shows that he belongs in the bowl just as much as the next blueberry! And he’s bringing some unexpected friends too!

Thank you Knopf Books for Young Readers for sending me a copy of Fruit Bowl. All thoughts and opinions are my own and not influenced by the free book.

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Run Wild

by David Covell

 

This book is such a beautiful picture book! I love the watercolor illustrations, they are soft but colorful and perfect for summer. Run Wild touches on all the fun summer activities you can do from running around barefoot outside. I  know you can do that most seasons but for some reason summer seems to be the time more people do it. Playing outside from sun up to sun down. The hot sand beaches that make you do the little hop skip dance so your feet don’t get to hot. Run Wild also touches on the intense summer storms that can pop up unannounced and dump rain on you. Everyone knows that summer rain brings fun puddles for splashing as well as frogs, snails and slugs. This picture book was like reliving my girls summer’s when they were little. This sweet picture book is perfect for a seasonal book unit, shelf, or story time.  The first day of summer is coming up in just a few weeks (June 21), this would be a great book to read and you can create your own Run Wild summer fun list.

About the book: Get back to nature in this gorgeous sunlit filled book that celebrates the joy of being outdoors.“Hey, you! Sky’s blue!” a girl shouts as she runs by the window of a boy bent over his digital device. Intrigued, the boy runs out after her, leaving his shoes (and phone) behind, and into a world of sunshine, dewey grass, and warm sand. Filled with the pleasures of being alive in the natural world, Run Wild is an exquisite and kid-friendly reminder of how wonderful life can be beyond doors and screens.

 Thank you Viking Books for Young Readers and Penguin Random House for sending me a copy of Run Wild. I can’t wait for school to start back up so I can read this to the new kindergarten students, they are going to love it. All thoughts and opinions are my own and not influenced by the free book.

Poppy, Buttercup, Bluebell and Dandy

written and illustrated by Fiona Woodcock

 

 

 

This picture book from the cover reminded me of the flower fairy chapter books my youngest loved when she was in kindergarten and first grade.  The illustrations are the strength in this picture book they are so beautiful and I love them. They are frame worthy works of art. The story was good and has a good message. They are on a mission to bring back color and happiness in the world – in this case New York City.  They spread their bold bright flower colors all over the city making it come alive with fresh fragrant flowers.  This would be a fun book to read at the beginning of spring when everything is starting to brighten up with color. Pair the book with some poppy, buttercup, bluebell and yellow flower seeds since I don’t think you can buy dandelion seeds 🙂 . Read the book – plant some flower seeds or plants or even better spread your own color by gifting some family and friends with the planted seeds on May-day and your little bookworm can be like these sweet little flowers!

About the book: A group of beautiful and feisty young wildflowers on skateboards and scooters zoom through the pages of this stunning book, spreading flower seeds as they go. Together they transform their urban environment into a place that is no longer gray, but filled with color and scent. Nature’s magic is revealed in all its glory, embodying Ralph Waldo Emerson’s idea that a weed is “a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered.” Budding environmentalists will respond to the underlying themes of conservation and stewardship of the earth.

Thank you Random House Books for Young Readers for sending me a copy of Poppy, Buttercup, Bluebell and Dandy. All thoughts are my own and not influenced by the free book.