The Only Child

by Guojing

The Only Child by Guojing

 

Oh My I can’t even begin to describe the beauty in this book. The Only Child is such a beautiful story. It is a wordless picture book so of course the story is written in illustrations. The illustrations are out of this world. I love pencil sketches the shading can say so much. I’m not sure if Guojing used pencils or charcoal or a mixture, maybe they used something all together different from what I’m thinking. The illustrations remind me of pencils with shading and maybe some charcoal mixed in. The Only Child is based on the authors own experiences growing up in China. They grew up in China in the 80’s during the one child policy. The parents worked hard and usually the grandma would be there but at times Guojing was home all alone and lonely. The illustrations in this book are frame worth, that along with the heartwarming story makes this a must get and gift picture book!

The Only Child 1

summary: A little girl – lost and alone – follows a mysterious stag deep into the woods, and like Alice down the rabbit hole, she finds herself in a strange and wondrous world. But home and family are very far away. How will she get back?

The Only Child 2

In this extraordinary wordless picture book, Goujing brilliantly captures the rich and deeply felt emotional life of a child- filled with loneliness and longing as well as the love and joy. 

Thank you so much Random House Kids and Guojing for allowing me to review The Only Child.  All thoughts and opinions are my own and were not influenced by the free book. This book is amazing and I think it needs to be on all bookshelves at home and schools!

Journey

There are so many amazing wordless picture books. I love using wordless books with kids of all ages. The story can become their own. They can use the illustrations to create their own story. The younger kids can use the wordless picture book to really take a look at the book and tell you what they think the book or each picture is about and trying to say.

My girls loved creating stories with their wordless books. I wrote a whole college paper for my children’s lit class about how wordless books create “writers” and “readers”.

Journey

illustrated by Aaron Becker

A 2014 Caldecott Honor Book

journey

Journey is kind of modern-day Harold and the Purple Crayon but with way better illustrations according to my 8-year-old. Journey follows a girl who is bored and maybe a bit lonely. Her mom is busy on the phone and making dinner, dad is on the computer and big sister is busy playing a game or texting. So she goes to her dark room and is sad. She stumbles upon a red marker and creates a door on her wall. From that door she begins a journey that will take her a magic carpet ride, down a river, through a forest and a castle moat maze. She hops aboard a hot air balloon and more.

Journey is such a great story that kids (and adults) will enjoy. Journey is one of the picture books that has great detail in the illustrations.  Journey has many objects that kids will recognize right away, while a few might take a bit of time. Follow along 1 girls journey to fun and maybe even friendship.

Time Flies

illustrated by Eric Rohman

Wordless Picture Book Wednesday

Notable Children’s Book 1995

ime

Follow a little birds journey and adventure into the land of the dinosaurs.  A bird flies into a dinosaur exhibit at a local museum. While perched on top of a t-rex’s tooth. After the bird takes off and soars through the museum you see the place through the imagination of the little bird.

The little bird is imagining what it would be like to fly with the first birds. Imagining that he/she is a pterosaurs or other dinosaur bird. While soaring in and out of the different exhibits within the museum the book ends with the bird flying right into the mouth of the t-rex the book started with. Little bird decides it is time to leave and join the birds of today.

This picture book is great and lends itself to some great discussions and story telling.

Some Discussion Questions you could use as prompts for read aloud time:

  • See if your child or students can name the dinosaurs  that are included in the book? You’d be amazed at how well they can say these incredibly hard names.
  • Compare what it was like between Land of the Dinosaurs and Today
  • Ask why they think the bird pretended to be flying with the big dinosaur birds?
  • Do they think the little bird will come back to the museum and play again?